Dan Schneiger - "Redundant Material 2.1" Sculpture

Redundant_Material2_1.jpg
Redundant_Material2_1.jpg

Dan Schneiger - "Redundant Material 2.1" Sculpture

3,000.00

Artist Statement

As an architect and artist, I have always been conscious of the symbiotic relationship between the two disciplines. I entered the architecture profession at the transition to the digital age, but I quickly learned that the modern design process had been upended by technology. Computers became the primary design tool and layers of abstraction were added to the design process, increasing the separation between how we design architecture and make art. Sensing this growing divide, I was compelled to make things with my hands that were architectural while consciously denying the impact of computers and conformance to the contemporary design process. My work is the product of the now archaic modern design process applied to the making of contemporary art. It is an exploration of the symbiosis between art and architecture and the tension between technology and handcraft.

 

"Redundant Material" Series

In the summer of 2015, I found myself alone in a small café in Florence, Italy, eavesdropping on a group of young English-speaking students at the table behind me talking about their new art classes. One was complaining that she had to carry a book around all semester. I was confused by the conversation until I realized that most required reading is now online. It made me feel old -- and it caused me to reflect on how archaic actual bound books have become. In the modern world, they join the ranks of physical audio forms like 8-track tapes, compact discs and cassettes, plus other printed materials like magazines and newspapers, as discarded means of communication. Returning to South Florida, I happened upon a local library that had filled two entire dumpsters with old hardcover books of all ages, sizes and subjects, most of them stamped "Redundant Material" because they are now available online and are no longer worth the space it takes to store them. Right then, I made the decision that archaic materials not only could be, but actually should be, part of the vocabulary of my sculptures. Because my aesthetic is in response to the now archaic modern design process as it applies to the making of contemporary art, I have chosen to include many other "throw-away" materials in this sculpture: books, parts of an old discarded dresser and pieces of salvaged interior wood paneling that were headed to a landfill, and the leftover scraps from my own hand-hewn sculptural furniture collecting dust in my studio. Everything in this sculpture is redundant and was originally used for something else. Collectively they now speak volumes about our throw-away society and the modern design process.

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